Cambridge Semantics Acquires SPARQL City’s IP, Expanding Analytics Capabilities

Enterprise analytics firm Cambridge Semantics has acquired the intellectual property of SPARQL City. It also hired former CEO and founder Barry Zane and other top executives from SPARQL CITY. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

The deal will enables Cambridge Semantics to expand its award-winning Anzo Smart Data Platform to offer unprecedented big data scale and value for enterprise-wide data lake and analytic initiatives. The SPARQL City in-memory graph query engine was specifically built for high-performance analytics, it allows organizations to conduct exploratory analytics at big data scale interactively.

Chuck Pieper, CEO of Cambridge Semantics, said in a statement: “We believe this IP acquisition is a game-changer for big data analytics and smart data discovery,” and also added this: “When coupled with our Anzo Smart Data Platform, no one else in the market can provide a similar end-to-end, semantic- and graph-based solution providing for data integration, data management and advanced analytics at the scale, context and speed that meets the needs of enterprises. The SPARQL City in-memory graph query engine allows users to conduct exploratory analytics at big data scale interactively.”

Chuck Pieper, CEO of Cambridge Semantics, said in a statement: “We wish to welcome Barry and other executives and staff from SPARQL City to Cambridge Semantics,” and also added: “Barry is a pioneer in massively parallel processing and analytics and we are excited that Barry and his team have joined with us to continue our commitment to a high level of innovation and excellence in this market space.”

Founded in 2007 and based in Boston, Massachusetts, Cambridge Semantics is an enterprise analytics and data management company. The company’s software, Anzo Smart data Platform, allows businesses to semantically link, analyze and manage diverse data whether internal or external, structured or unstructured, with speed, at big scale and at the fraction of the implementation costs of using the traditional tools. 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s